Today's Quote:
Government's view of the economy could be summed up in a few short phrases: If it moves, tax it. If it keeps moving, regulate it. And if it stops moving, subsidize it.
~ Ronald Reagan

Per Diem Rates Look-Up

Larry Villano, Publisher of LoopholeLewy.com

Taxpayers Receiving Identity Verification Letter Should Use IDVerify.irs.gov


The Internal Revenue Service is reminding taxpayers who receive requests from the IRS to verify their identities that the Identity Verification Service website, idverify.irs.gov, offers the fastest and easiest way to complete the task.

Taxpayers may receive a letter when the IRS stops suspicious tax returns that have indications of being identity theft but contains a real taxpayer’s name and/or Social Security number.

Letter 5071C

Only those taxpayers receiving Letter 5071C should access idverify.irs.gov. The website will ask a series of questions that only the real taxpayer can answer.

Once the identity is verified, the taxpayers can confirm whether or not they filed the return in question. If they did not file the return, the IRS can take steps at that time to assist them. If they did file the return, it will take approximately six weeks to process it and issue a refund.

Letter 5071C is mailed through the U.S. Postal Service to the address on the return. It asks taxpayers to verify their identities in order for the IRS to complete processing of the returns if the taxpayers did file it or reject the returns if the taxpayers did not file it.

The IRS does not request such information via email, nor will the IRS call a taxpayer directly to ask this information without you receiving a letter first. The letter number can be found in the upper corner of the page.

The letter gives taxpayers two options to contact the IRS and confirm whether or not they filed the return. Taxpayers may use the idverify.irs.gov site or call a toll-free number on the letter. Because of the high-volume on the toll-free numbers, the IRS-sponsored website, idverify.irs.gov, is the safest, fastest option for taxpayers with web access.

Taxpayers should have available their prior year tax return and their current year tax return, if they filed one, including supporting documents, such as Forms W-2 and 1099 and Schedules A and C.

Taxpayers also may access idverify.irs.gov through www.IRS.gov by going to "Understanding Your 5071C Lette"r or the "Understanding Your IRS Notice or Letter" page. The tool is also available in Spanish. Taxpayers should always be aware of tax scams, efforts to solicit personally identifiable information and IRS impersonations. However, idverify.irs.gov is a secure, IRS-supported site that allows taxpayers to verify their identities quickly and safely

Updates

Tax Changes for 2014

Several important tax changes went into affect in 2014. Depending on your income, age, marital status, or whether you operate a business, you could be affected.

2014 tax changes >

Tips and Tid Bits

IRS Collects $2.9 Trillion During Fiscal Year 2013

During fiscal year 2013, the IRS collected almost $2.9 trillion in federal revenue and processed 240 million returns of which 151 million were filed electronically. Out of the 146 million individual income tax returns filed, almost 83 percent were e-filed. More than 118 million individual income tax return filers received a tax refund, which totaled almost $312.8 billion. On average, the IRS spent 41 cents to collect $100 in tax revenue during fiscal year 2013.

Over 99% of All Returns Unaudited

The IRS examined just under one percent of all tax returns filed and about one percent of all individual income tax returns during fiscal year 2013. Of the 1.4 million individual tax returns examined, over 39,000 resulted in additional refunds.

Seven States With No Personal Income tax

Seven states do not have a personal income tax. They are: Alaska, Florida, Nevada, South Dakota, Texas, Washington, and Wyoming. New Hampshire and Tennessee do not tax wages. They tax investment income from stocks and bonds.

How the IRS Flags Excessive Travel Expenses

The IRS uses occupational codes to measure typical amounts of travel by profession. A tax return showing 20 percent or more above the norm might get a second look? Here are a few other red flags that can trigger an IRS audit .

Did You Rob a Bank Last Year?

Silly as it may seem, if you robbed a bank dung 2013, you had taxable income. Intentionally not reporting ill-gotten gains is considered tax evasion. The IRS doesn't care how we "earn" our loot as long as they get their cut, from a tax compliance standpoint of course. So, if you're selling drugs or scamming investors and not reporting the income, some day you could find yourself in the same predicament that Al Capone found himself in! Here are some of the top tax myths.